Tag Archives: UVU

Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) commemoration at UVU

Members of the Utah International Mountain Forum joined the Office for Global Engagement and Multicultural Student Services to commemorate Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) at Utah Valley University.  The commemoration was marked with the creation of a large mural, which was painted on the glass panes in the lobby area of the Center for Global & Intercultural Engagement.  It was available to be viewed by all the students and members of the community from October 31st to November 2nd, 2017.

The genesis of the project came from Carlos Alarco, Luis Lopez and Augustin Diaz. They had been thinking of a way to educate students, and community members, about cultural practices from other parts of the world.  After discussing several ideas, th concept of creating a mural and altar to commemorate Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) came to mind. The main purpose of the mural and altar was to education students, and the community, about this important cultural tradtion and allow them to interact with it as well.

The mural was created with the help of art students from Utah Valley University and it marks the first time such a large scale event was held on campus.

Artists painting the mural

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, particularly the Central and South regions as well as the mountain regions. It is also celebrated  by people of Mexican ancestry living in other countries like the United States. It teaches people to not fear death and celebrate it, to honor the memory of loved ones, and never forget them. This tradition has its roots in the Aztec celebration of the goddess Mictecacihuatl, the goddess of the underworld, her role was to watch over the bones of the dead and preside over ancient festivals of the dead.

View of the mural from the outside of the Center for Global & Intercultural Engagenment

The most important element of the commemoration is the creation of an Offrenda (Altar).  Photos of deceased loved ones adorn the altar and their favorite dishes and treats are prepared. Drinks are also placed on the altar to quench the thirst of the dead after their long journey back home. Altars are also decorated with items like: marigolds, pan de muerto, calaveras and papel picado. Each have an important meaning in this cultural tradition. Marigolds referred to as flor de muerto or flower of the dead, are thought to attract souls to the altars decorated in their honor to welcome them. Food is used as a connection between the dead and living world. Pan de muerto (bread of the dead) is a semi-sweet bread that is baked and dusted with sugar to represent the soil that the bodies are buried in. Calaveras (Sugar Skulls) are decorated with bright patterns and colorful designs, representing the vitality of life and the unique personalities of people. Papel Picado (Perforated Paper) is colored tissue paper used to decorate the spaces which are being used to honor the dead. These colorful, but fragile decorations represent the fragility of life.

The Altar from inside the lobby area of the Center for Global & Intercultural Engagenment

The altar was decorated by people who work at UVU, as well as the local community, and included pictures of loved ones and famous people of mexican desent. Apart from being an educational experience, it also was an interactive one. We engaged with members of the the University community by allowing them the write the names of a loved one that had passed on the glass panels next to the mural. This helped people remember those that had passed by making their names visible to all. There were names from all over the world showing that no matter we are from we can all participate in this tradition. Death is something that happens to all of us and remembering our loved ones is an experience that we can all share.

Names of loved ones that had passed

The event was a great success and many people were able to find out about this beautiful and vibrant tradition.

In 2008, el Dia de los Muertos was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

Carlos Alarco – UIMF

 

Promoting Mountain Targets During UN Day at UVU

On October 24th, 2017 students from Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs from Utah Valley University (UVU) participated at the celebration of the United Nations Day while promoting sustainable mountain targets. The event was hosted by the UVU Office of Global Engagement with a particular focus on the meaning and importance of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Attending the event were UIMF, National Security Club, Foreign Affairs Club, Model UN Club, UNICEF Club, ENACTUS initiative of the UVU Woodbury School of Business, and representatives from the UVU Office of Global Engagement. Students, through engaged learning approach interacted, were very pleased to see the level of activity and engagement from all the UVU students and faculty in learning how to work towards the implementation of 17 United Nations SGDs and 169 targets

Poster about UIMF members contribution to the adoption of the mountain targets among SDGs during 2013-2015.

The event went on from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. to allow for the maximum amount of UVU student and faculty engagement. UIMF members were excited to be engaged with those who came to the event to explain mountain targets role among the UN SDGs. They also explained how the United Nations Mountain Partnership Secretariat, a subunit of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations coordinates globally activities of numerous institutions and NGOs, including UVU  with focus on Sustainable Mountain Development (SMD) agenda of the United Nations. UIMF members contributed to the campaign to adopt mountain targets among SDGs by the United Nations during 2013-2015. Jesler Molina, former UIMF President also informed the audience how he was able, with his peers, to participate at campaign and even make a statement during the sixth session of the United Nations Open Working Group on SDGs in December 11, 2013. UIMF members were happy, when in September 25-27, 2015 the United Nations Summit on Sustainable Development adopted SDGs three mountain targets were included among them.

(L to R) Andre Jones, UIMF member, discusses with Derek Garfield, Vice President, UIMF, and Dylan Genes, President, Foreign Affairs Club, initiatives at UVU to implement mountain targets as part of SDGs.

UIMF also showcased student projects that are important to sustainable mountain development. Derek Garfield, a Vice President of UIMF, presented his project about Sami indigenous communities in Scandinavian states and how new challenges like climate change have an impact on their livelihoods. It is one of the goals of UIMF to push for students to have a platform to present their projects, therefore it was very exciting to have Mr. Garfield in attendance to further educate students about his project as an example of both to be engaged with the United Nations Sustainable Mountain Development (SMD) Agenda and to inspire other students to do research based on their professional interests.

     (L to R) Lacee Meyer, Vice President UIMF, Derek Garfield, Vice President UIMF, Matthew Rands, President UIMF, (behind) Dylan Genes, President Foreign Affairs, (front) Dr. Baldomero Lago, CIO/Vice-Rector of UVU’s Office of Global Engagement during the UN Day at UVU

Dylan Genes, the President of Foreign Affairs, a club under the umbrella of UIMF, played a big role in the event as he was able to stay for the entirety of the event and take time to talk to each individual that showed interest in the 17 SDGs and how mountain target fit among them. He stated that “UN day at UVU proved to be an enlightened and fulfilling experience for participating clubs and members alike, including myself. I strongly feel that reaching out and engaging in dialogue has helped not only the students learn about our initiatives with focus on UN SMD agenda, but helped club members grow in defining mission goals.” Dylan highlighted the very nature and initiatives of UIMF to engage students in the initiatives for UN sustainable mountain development while also creating dialogue with different demographic groups among them by providing them great opportunities for professional growth and advancement.

Rebecca Bindraban contributed to the event by informing students about her work as co-editor of the “Youth and the Mountains” Journal, which publishes student research papers with focus on SMD and implementation of the mountain targets since 2013. She stated that “The UN Day at UVU was significant because it showcased the UIMF activities and the clubs in coalition with the UIMF. It shined a spot light on the important issues with focus on SMD each club is trying to perpetuate along with supporting an open forum to talk with students about the clubs. During the event, I talked to several students about UIMF initiatives and goals, promoting mountain communities, and it was a great because it provided a forum to have a casual open conversation. By talking to different students, the UIMF’s goals and issues were discussed, and students learned about our clubs and opportunities they have in the future to get engaged.”

UIMF hopes to continue to work towards the SDGs, with a specific goal of implementation of mountain targets. On December 4th, 2017 UIMF will have another opportunity to do that by hosting an event in celebration of the United Nation’s International Mountain Day. It is an honor to work with the United Nations in reaching these initiatives and UIMF hopes to continue to work also towards the implementation of UN Post-2015 and towards the UN 2030 agendas.

Lacee Meyer, Vice President, UIMF

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FAO and MP about event

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Task list

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Photos from the event

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STUDENT REFLECTIVE ESSAYS

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Lacee Meyer: Event announcement

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Dylan Genes: UN day at Utah Valley University focuses on sustainable development goals

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Rebecca Bindraban: advocating mountain targets through student academic research 

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Andre Jones: United Nations Day at Utah Valley University focuses on sustainable development goals

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Derek Garfield: United Nations info fair at Utah Valley University

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Mary Cisneros: Reflections of my undergraduate years at Utah Valley University

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2016 United Nations International Mountain Day Celebration at Utah Valley University

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On December 2, 2016, the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at Utah Valley University (UVU) will celebrate International Mountain Day (IMD), established by the United Nations in 2003. UVU students will host the annual IMD celebration for the sixth time one week before December 11, which is the official date established by the UN for the IMD celebration, because of the coincidence of that date and the beginning of final examinations at the university. As a keynote presenter, they will host Ms. Mehak, director of the documentary “Daughter of Kalash,” as a follow up to the Women of the Mountains Conference (WOMC) under the umbrella of the UN Mountain Partnership (MP) held at UVU on October 7-9, 2015. WOMC was highlighted in the 2015 Annual Report of the MP as successfully hosted for the first time by students (http://www.fao.org/3/a-i5490e.pdf, PP. 3, 13, 39). Ms. Mehak was not able to participate at the WOMC last year, therefore students raised funds to bring a foreign dignitary to Utah for the 2016 IMD commemoration.

The main theme for this year’s IMD is Mountain Cultures: Celebrating Diversity and Strengthening Identity.”

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Preliminary agenda of the 2016 IMD:

  1. Greetings from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations on the occasion of the IMD.
  2. Report about major initiatives and activities of UVU students during 2016 to advocate the sustainable mountain development (SMD) agenda of the United Nations in the State of Utah and North America, Tony Medina, President, UIMF.
  3. Presentation of Certificates for contribution to the SMD advocacy during 2016 to the faculty, students, and community representatives.
  4. Presentation of the ethnographic field work in Congo, “Mountains are not only geography, but also culture!” Jacques Baraketse, Sam Kabwika and Dr. Patience Kabamba, Utah Valley University.
  5. Keynote presentation of Ms. Mehak Asad, Assistant Director, GEO TV in Pakistan and director of the documentary film “Daughter of Kalash.” (https://vimeo.com/140086936)   Asad will speak about her film and the issues facing the Kalash people.

In February of 2014, the New York Times published an article highlighting the unique lineage of the small and reclusive Kalash tribe. It would not be a surprise to many in their community if this is still the first time you have heard of them. As one of Pakistan’s smallest and most unique religious communities, they have faced centuries of hardships and possible extinction of their ways and customs. And while they have begun to rebound slightly, they still face many contemporary issues to maintain their unique way of life.

While their exact etymology is still somewhat of a mystery, a team of scientists, led by Simon Myers of Oxford University, have found a more recognized genome mixed into the Kalash people’s DNA. “Another mixing event is the injection of European-type DNA into the Kalash, a people of Pakistan, at some time between 990 and 210 B.C. This could reflect the invasion of India by Alexander the Great in 326 B.C. The Kalash claim to be descended from Alexander’s soldiers, as do several other groups in the region (Wade, Nicholas, “Tracing ancestry, researchers produce a genetic atlas of human mixing events,” The New York Times, (NY: NY, Feb. 13, 2014.).” With dwindling numbers and a rugged and remote area of the world they call home, it is no wonder they struggle to keep their beliefs and customs relevant to their youth.

Due their homeland’s placement on the map, they struggle continuously to fend off both Islamic extremists and governmental mandates. They have continuously been attacked by proselyting Muslim militants, the Afghani Taliban, and Pakistani mandates for conversion to Islam in the 1970s. Additionally, their polytheistic religious beliefs have fueled a rumor that they possess “immortality.” This has led to several attacks on their villages by the surrounding Muslim community.

With a generous count of just over 3,000 people who claim the Kalash faith, their religion is a blend of ancient Hindu, pre-Islamic Nuristan, and contain many of the Indo-Iranian myths, rituals, and aspects of their ancient society including dress, diet, and customs. To combat their dwindling numbers, their village will shun a Muslim convert to both deter others from converting to Islam, and keep their blood line “pure.” As one village leader put it, “If any Kalash converts to Islam, they cannot live among us anymore. We keep our identity strong (Raffaele, Paul, Smithsonian Jan. 2007).”

  1. Screening of the documentary.
  2. Q&A with Ms. Mehak Asad
  3. Reception

The event will be held in the Utah Valley University’s Library room LI 120 from 2 PM to 7 PM.

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HOST OF THE 2016 IMD CELEBRATION

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www.utahimf.org;

SPONSORS OF THE 2016 IMD CELEBRATION

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For more information, please feel free to contact the president of the UIMF, Tony Medina, at tony.h.medina@gmail.com.

Information on previous International Mountain Day celebrations can be found here.

Tony Medina, President of UIMF and Deann Torsak, Executive Secretary of the 2015 Women of the Mountains Conference

UVU Attends Discussion on Sustainable Mountain Development at the UN Headquarters

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Yanko Dzhukev, a member of Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at Utah Valley University (UVU), and currently the first UVU intern at the United Nations Secretariat, Office of Legal Affairs, on 6 May 2016 joined United Nations (UN) diplomats at the UN headquarters in New York, for a discussion to mobilize efforts to address the rising rate of food insecurity and malnutrition in the mountainous areas of developing countries.

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The event, organized by the Permanent Missions of Italy, Kyrgyz Republic, Malawi and Peru to the UN, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Liaison Office in New York and Mountain Partnership Secretariat (MPS) discussed the findings of a study called “Mapping the vulnerability of mountain peoples to food insecurity”. Launched on the International Mountain Day 2015 by the FAO and the MPS, the study aims to provide the most accurate possible estimate of the vulnerability to food insecurity in mountain areas, based on the best technologies and data available.

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The study reveals alarming trend:  while food insecurity decreased at global level, in rural mountainous areas of developing countries, vulnerability to food insecurity increased to one in every two people between 2000 and 2012. As the 2030 Development Agenda pledges to leave no one behind and stresses the importance of reaching those furthest behind first. Among the groups that require special attention are mountain peoples.

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While presenting the study that gives a current picture of hunger in the mountains the Mountain Partnership Secretariat Coordinator Thomas Hofer said: “Every third person in the mountains in developing countries is food insecure, a rate that is unacceptably high”.

In addition the Mountain Partnership Secretariat announced the launch of a Mountain Facility, or funding mechanism, to address the rising threat of hunger in the mountain areas of developing countries. The new funding mechanism has the goal to help empower vulnerable mountain communities, increase their food security and eradicate poverty.

The Permanent Representative of Italy to the UN invited all partners to contribute to the Facility. “Italy welcomes FAO’s initiative to launch a Mountain Facility as a new funding mechanism, linked to the Mountain Partnership, to address food security crises in mountain regions,” said Ambassador Sebastiano Cardi, who noted that Italy is one of the founding party of the Mountain Partnership and a major donor.

In addition H.E. Ambassador Mirgul Moldoisaeva, Permanent Representative of the Kyrgyz Republic to the UN acknowledged the extraordinary work that the Mountain Partnership has accomplished: “Global alliances such as the Mountain Partnership allow us to create an effective global platform for poverty alleviation and food security in support of our national efforts.” Kyrgyz Republic has been active not on only on local level but globally in investing in institutional capacity, food security and resilience building.

In a statement, Yanko Dzhukev indicated that UVU is fully dedicated in continuing the tradition in advocating for sustainable mountain development and ready to fully incorporate the mountain indicators among the SDGs, and now proceed with laying foundation for the post 2015-development agenda, also known as “2030 Agenda” of the United Nations. In addition he indicated that “Mapping the vulnerability of mountain peoples to food insecurity” highlights the current situation in the mountains and it is important to show the world the significance of the mountain regions and from the developing countries in particular.

UVU, as a Mountain Partnership member was the only educational institution that attended the event. The discussion was also attended by dignities such as the Mountain Partnership Ambassador Jake Norton, who made a statement on behalf of mountain peoples around the world. He proclaimed that “if we want a healthy earth, we have to have healthy mountains, and to have healthy mountains, we must have healthy mountain communities”.

The discussion was also attended by Andrew Taber, Executive Director of the Mountain Institute and Karinjo Devore, president of the Aspen International Mountain Foundation and a focal point of the Mountain Partnership in North America.

UVU has been a member of the Mountain Partnership since 2006 with a long-lasting mission to raise awareness, to mobilize support from institutions within the U.S. mountain states and global mountain entities, and to assist in the sustainable development of the mountain communities of the world.

 

Download the publication: http://www.mountainpartnership.org/publications/publication-detail/en/c/357944/

For more information about the Women of the Mountains conferences: http://www.womenofthemountains.org

International Women’s Day Celebration at UVU

From March 1 – 8, 2016 the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF) will sponsoring a series of events to celebrate International Women’s Day at Utah Valley University.

On March 7th, 2016 the UIMF and Women of the Mountains will be hosting a special screening of “To Climb a Gold Mountain” at 6:00pm. Events will start at 5:30pm with presentation of certificates to participants of the 2015 International Women of the Mountains Conference then followed by the documentary.

All events will be held in the UVU Library auditorium, room LI 120.

International Women's Day at Utah Valley University

UVU Student Reports About His Internship at FAO-UN

To Dr. Rusty Butler, Associate VP for International Affairs and Diplomacy, Utah Valley University

Dear Dr. Butler,

I would like take this opportunity to sincerely thank you for the chance you gave me. Without your support and the assistance from Utah Valley University, I would have never even imagined that I could have been able to be a part of FAO as an intern and work with the Mountain Partnership Secretariat.

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I have been here for more than one month, and working under the direct supervision of Thomas and Mia is great. I have learned how the Partnership functions and I am not just some intern who is doing negligible and insignificant work, I am actually responsible for different tasks and I have very significant responsibilities. I have been treated as equal and I fully participate in the day-to-day operations of the Secretariat.

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Dr Butler, Utah Valley University and you especially, are tremendously respected within the MPS.  Now, when I am here, I see that the work that you have done advocating for gender equality and sustainable mountain development, not only in North America but globally, is highly appreciated.

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I have been doing my best to represent myself and UVU in the best possible way.

With best regards,

Yanko Dzhukev
Advocacy and Communications Intern
Mountain Partnership Secretariat
FAO Forestry Department

My experience with the International Women of the Mountains Conference

Carlos is currently the Coordinator for Global Academic Programs at the Office for Global Engagement at Utah Valley University. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Digital Media from Utah Valley University and a Master’s of Education from the University of Missouri. He is a Global Citizen having lived in Latin America, Australia and the United States. He likes being involved in Social Justice causes and travelling the world.

From an early age, I have been exposed to people and cultures from around the world, due to living in a multicultural part of Sydney, Australia. I was born in Latin-America and travelled a lot as a child with my parents where I was able to experience life with relatives abroad. Growing up in a different land to that of my parents, my personal culture became a mixture of the two, Latin-American and Australian. By the time I was an adult I was a seasoned traveller with a great appreciation for the cultures of the world. When I moved to the United States most of the studies I had done in Australia were not recognized so I had to go back to school. I enrolled into, what was known as, Utah Valley State College as a non-traditional student. To this day I am grateful to UVU’s open enrolment policy as it provided me with the opportunity to better myself. I finished my Undergraduate Degree in Digital Media and then went on to get a Master’s Degree in Information Science and Learning Technologies. I have always believed that education is key to a life of unlimited potential and I am a strong advocate for the belief that education should be freely available to all regardless of gender, age or location.

In 2005, working as a Technology Teaching Assistant at Utah Valley State College, I learned that the school had access to video conferencing equipment. That same year I was able to get permission to use the equipment and organized a series of international video lectures with Universities that I had built a relationship with in my travels abroad. These were the days before Skype or Google Hangouts, so high-quality videoconferencing required expensive equipment that not all institutions could afford. This also meant working with the IT departments of the other institutions to configure protocols that would ensure a stable connection. The first of these videoconferencing lectures was organized between James Cook University in Australia and Utah Valley State College here in Utah. These lectures were presented live with attendees on both sides. One of the first lectures was from Australia. Dr Jamie Seymour, a leading expert on jellyfish, presented on a particularly deadly jellyfish that inhabits the tropic oceans of Australia. Mr. Mike Wisland from the Digital Media Department gave his presentation on the Beatles song, Strawberry Fields Forever. These presentations were enjoyed by audiences on both sides. There were also other video conferences with the Czech Republic, Spain, Brazil and a session with the U.S. Department of State. Technology has made it possible to connect people, share ideas, and mutually learn. This is the goal of the internationalization of education.

The experience with the video conferences taught me first hand, about the power of connecting people to share ideas and learn from each other. The idea of bringing people together appealed to me, and still does. It was through this interest that a few years later, I became acquainted with Dr. Baktybek Abdrisaev, the former Ambassador of the Kyrgyz Republic to the United States. As faculty at UVU, he brought his considerable wealth of knowledge and diplomatic experience to the university, in building stronger ties between the mountain communities, his native country, the Rocky Mountain region and especially Utah through the United Nations sustainable mountain development (SMD) agenda. Through this friendship, I began using my technical experience to help promote events that he would organize with his students. Eventually I was given the responsibility of managing the Women of the Mountains’ website (http://www.womenofthemountains.org), which contained a vast amount of information about the international Women of the Mountains Conferences, hosted by Utah Valley University as major contribution to the promotion of SMD in State of Utah and North America.  I was responsible for adding content and making updates to the website as events were organized. I also became involved with the Utah International Mountain Forum, a coalition of student clubs at UVU that became the main force for SMD advocacy. Here student engagement was promoted through organizing events, hosting dignitaries, and sharing experience with a wider community on a state, regional and global levels. My Andean heritage also played a part in my interest, as many of my ancestors came from the mountain regions of South America.

My first experience with the International Women of the Mountains Conference was at the 2nd Conference, which was held in 2011.  Here I volunteered with providing technical support to presenters, volunteers and attendees of the conference. The conference was held at the main campus of Utah Valley University so I was able to interact with many of the guest speakers, some of which came from overseas, and learn more about the work that they did to promote sustainable development in various mountain regions. It was the first time I had been directly involved in an international conference. After the Women of the Mountains Conference I began to help with the United Nations International Mountain Day celebrations at UVU campus. In 2003 the United Nations General Assembly declared December 11 as the International Mountain Day, and celebrations have been held at UVU since 2010.

My involvement with the International Women of the Mountains Conference and the Utah International Mountain Forum led to being part of a delegation from Utah Valley University sent to the United Nations headquarters in New York City in December, 2013. Due to the work of Dr. Rusty Butler, Associate VP for International Affairs and Diplomacy at UVU, and his personal ties to many diplomats at the United Nations, the University was able to secure seats to observe the 6th Session of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These seats were provided by the Permanent Mission of Hungary to the U.N. Attending this meeting was an incredible experience for us, as we witnessed first-hand how the delegates of each nation worked to add details to what would become the SDGs and the roadmap for global community development until 2030. We were there for three days and after each session was over we were able to meet and interact with some of the delegates from the different nations, and this was exciting. This trip has been one of the highlights of my life and I hope to repeat it in the future.

The 4th International Women of the Mountains Conference, held under the umbrella of the United Nations Mountain Partnership, took place at Utah Valley University in October 2015. My involvement in the conference was as the organizing committee’s liaison to the University of Utah. The committee was primarily made up of students as well as partners, all under the guidance of Dr. Abdrisaev and other faculty.  A few weeks prior to the conference I arranged for the student organizing committee the presentation at the University of Utah to invite students there to join organizing committee and to contribute to the conference at UVU. As a tradition, I was also tasked with updating the Women of the Mountains website and added information needed by attendees. This was also the first conference where social media was used to help promote the conference and its goals in support of the SDG#5 on gender. During the conference, I also gave a presentation about the importance of Social Media in the promotion of grassroots efforts and how it could be used to reach more people with little to no cost compared to traditional methods of promotion. The presentation also showed how visits to the websites had significantly increase since social media was introduced as a promotional tool. I had the opportunity to meet many amazing people who are passionate about gender and environmental issues. It was also a pleasure to meet officers from global NGOs like Ms. Mia Rowan from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO-UN). Working directly with partners like her helps promote our work to a wider audience.

That same year I organized an International Mountain Day Celebration at the University of Utah. This was held on 4th of December, 2015 in the Gould Auditorium which is located in the Marriott Library. I was supported by Kamaile Harris, who works with the Pacific Heritage Academy as well as she became the Salt Lake City Liaison for the UIMF. I was, at the time, the University of Utah Liaison and had built relationships with many important organizations such as: the Marriott Library, the Office of Sustainability, the Bennion Center, the Hinckley Institute and local Non-Profits. We promoted the event via social media as well as through internal channels at the University, there was even promotion through local radio station KRCL. The event started with a song by students of the Pacific Heritage Academy which was a great way to begin the event. The evening continued with students, from the University of Utah, who spoke about the issues relating to community and sustainability in the local mountain region. The main speaker of the event as Jason Singer Smith, who is a prominent mountain climber and author. The event was well received by audience and participants and brought to the attention of the community the importance of mountain issues.

I enjoy my continued relationship with the members of the organizing committee of the Women of the Mountains conference and the Utah International Mountain Forum. To further my education in SMD, I took courses from the University of the Highlands and Islands in the United Kingdom as well as the University of Utah. I have had the opportunity to meet and work with so many great people over the years and had experiences that I could not have had it not been for my involvement with these organizations. The opportunity to be a part of something greater than myself and help improve the lives of people locally and around the world is something that has no price and will cherish for all of days.

 

Carlos Alarco – UIMF

 

UVU Peru Study Abroad Follows Up Women of the Mountains Conference Goals

UVU Study Abroad program in Peru was held this May 2014. Dr. Sara Ulloa, Associate Professor of UVU Languages Department, and Advisor to the Sustainable Mountain Development Club at UVU   led a group of 19 students from Spanish, health, business, engineering and other fields to immerse themselves in the language and culture while providing service to Andean communities.

Group visited several places in Cusco and La Libertad to build bridges of understanding with Andean communities and its peoples. Collaborating internationally, students were able to start research on different aspects in order to promote solutions to problems and enrich the quality of life of its people. Research was based on the influence of the high altitude and remoteness on the living conditions of families, children and women in particular.

These issues were the focus of the Third International Conference Women of the Mountains, which UVU co-hosted in 2012 in Puno, Peru. The Conference in 2012 helped established closer relationships between the Rocky Mountain States, and Utah in particular, and the mountain communities and their families living on the high altitude of the Peruvian Andes. As one of the outcomes of the gathering in 2012 was the decision from UVU to create a study abroad program to bring faculty and students in order to continue work on the issues of gender and sustainable mountain development in Peru.

ulloa1 Group Picture: UVU Faculty and Students Together With Ccasacunca Community, Cuzco, Peru

During their stay in Peru, students met local people from the villages neighboring Cusco and Trujillo and experienced first-hand how it is to live in Andean communities. Students were able to make connections; find similarities and differences among their own culture and the Andean culture in order to intertwine this knowledge to an integrated view of the world.  Students who participated in this program returned home with a greater appreciation for others around the world and a better foundation for living and working in order to provide further assistance.

As a part of the program, UVU students also helped locals with schoolwork and brought school supplies and toys for children. In addition, plans for future cooperation between Utah and Peru, specially UVU and Cusco were discussed.

Faculty and students also visited local universities and discussed with local hosts plans for educational exchanges and mutual cooperation. Local scholars and faculty also expressed a strong interest to attend the Fourth international Women of the Mountains, which UVU will co-host in October 2015.

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UVU Students Meeting Local Leaders and Children

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UVU Students and Andean Children Rendering Honors to Andean Leaders

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UVU Student, Matt French, presented UVU Souvenirs to Trujillo Teachers

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UVU Students Teaching Children in BiblioBus, La Libertad

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UVU Peru Study Abroad Group 2014, Machu Picchu, Peru

Furthermore, members of delegation were thrilled to visit famous and popular Machu Picchu and other touristic sites. Andean tour taught them about great heritage and skills in architecture of ancient Inca Empire, who were able to reach high peaks of civilization in such harsh environment of the mountainous Andes.

Fritz Culp and Matthew French, UVU students

Celebrating International Women’s Day at UVU

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UVU Hosts Body Image Experts For International Women’s Day Events

28 FEBRUARY 2014 ONE COMMENT

February 28, 2014

For Immediate Release

University Marketing & Communications: Melinda Colton

Written by: Heather Wrigley

On March 7, Utah Valley University will host “Beauty Redefined,” a celebration of International Women’s Day, with two sessions featuring keynote addresses by inspiring speakers, entertainment by international dancers and food.

“International Women’s Day is a special day in which we celebrate women,” said Marie Poudiougou, an assistant at the UVU International Affairs & Diplomacy Office. “It is all about empowering women, recognize their efforts in making this world a better place, recognizing their beauty both inside and outside.”

The first session will take place from noon to 2 p.m. at UVU Centre Stage, centrally located on the main floor of the Sorensen Student Center. It will include a short lecture on body image, which will be followed by a presentation from the UVU Women of Science Club and an award ceremony. Free lunch will be provided.

The second session will be from 6 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. It will consist of a presentation by the main speakers Lindsay and Lexie Kite, two sisters who earned their doctoral degrees in the study of media and body image from the University of Utah. “Beauty Redefined” represents their not-for-profit work through the Beauty Redefined Foundation to take back beauty for girls and women everywhere through continuing the discussion about body image, women’s potential and media influence. Their one-hour visual presentation on recognizing and rejecting harmful media ideals about beauty and health has been presented to thousands of people across the state of Utah and beyond since March 2009. They will offer their keynote in the UVU Grande Ballroom, in the Sorensen Student Center.

Their address will be followed by a short presentation from international students and performances by Polynesian, African, Japanese and Mongolian dancers. The event will end with international appetizers.

Both sessions are free of charge. Tickets are available at UVU’s Campus Connection, or by contacting Marie Poudiougou at 801-472-8769 or mariep@uvu.edu.

International Women Day: Beauty Redefined

Agenda

Friday March 7th

Grand Ballroom

Host: Marie/Liz

5: 00 pm                    Set up: Making sure everything is good to go. Projector, PowerPoint, Microphone, Water for the Speakers…..

5: 45                            Music -Japanese instrument/ People arrival and International appetizers

6: 00                           Opening Remarks by Marie Poudiougou, President of the Foreign Affairs Club, Chair Assistant of the International Student Council.

6:05                            Performance: Best Afrodancer, A group of African Dancer from the Republic of Congo

6: 20                           Address of the International Students, Jawahir Ahmed and Tamara Harutyunova, International aspect/Views of beauty

6:40                            Introduction of Lindsay Kite and Lexie Kite by Elizabeth Jarema, Executive Vice President, UVU Student Association.

6: 45                           Address of Lindsay Kite and Lexie Kite, PhDs in the study of media and body image.

7: 30                           Performance: the Polynesian dancer, Multicultural Dancer

7: 45                           Address of the International Students Eri Hyward-Japan,  Paola Rondon- Venezuela,  International aspect/Views of beauty

8: 10                           Performance: Mongolian Dancer, traditional dance by a UVU student

8: 15                           Closing remarks by Anne Wairepo, Director of the Women Success Center

8: 20                           Prices, by UVUSA election winner

8:30                            End of event