UVU Rotaract and United Nations 75th Anniversary

On Monday March 2, 2020, Utah Valley University (UVU) Rotaract in junction with the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), and the UVU Office for Global Engagement hosted a panel in celebration of the 75th anniversary of the United Nations. The event was hosted from 10:30-11:30AM (MST) in the Liberal Arts Building (LA) 116. “UVU and the United Nations 75th Anniversary” was open to all interested members of the community.

Kyle Warren, UVU Rotaract President moderated the event

Rotaract is the student organization of Rotary International which is an international organization founded in 1905. Since its founding, Rotary has grown to over one-million members worldwide. Individual Rotary clubs exist all over the globe. Each club is actively involved in humanitarian and other service efforts in their local communities and around the world. Rotaract, Rotary’s student branch is comprised of individuals whose ages range from eighteen to thirty. These student branches are also found all over the world, the first one being formed in 1968. UVU Rotaract is also a member of the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at UVU to promote the United Nations sustainable mountain development agenda in the state of Utah and North America.

The main event of UVU and the United Nations 75th Anniversary was a panel consisting of five individuals from the local community. The panelists were selected from among UVU faculty, as well as local NGOs: Dr. Baldomero Lago, Dr. Geoffrey Cockerham, Dr. Ryan Vogel, Dr. Baktybek Abdrisaev, and Clark Merkley. Each Panelists focused on a different aspect of the United Nations, with subjects ranging from the history of the UN to the effects of the UN in our local communities. The current efforts of local groups in reaching for the UN 2030 sustainable development goals (SDGs) were also discussed. Kyle Warren, President of the hosting organization, UVU Rotaract, moderated the panel. As the panelists concluded remarks, we then turned the time over to the audience for a period of questions and answers.

Dr. Baldomero Lago Speaks about UN -UVU Partnership

The fist panelist to speak was Dr. Baldomero Lago, CIO for UVU Global Engagement. Dr. Lago works with many international organizations. He serves as the Honorary Consul of Spain for Utah and was awarded the title of Knight Commander of the Royal Order of Civil Merit by King Phillip VI of Spain. Dr. Lago spoke on Utah Valley University’s involvement with the United Nations and how the University interacts with the UN. He made remarks about how UVU was able to help coordinate the recent civil society conference which was held in Salt Lake City in the summer of 2019. In addition to the past civil society conference, Dr. Lago talked about how UVU held its very first high school model UN conference, as well as the upcoming global Civil Society Conference being planned for August of 2021 on sustainable development being held at Utah Valley University.

Dr. Geoffrey Cockerham during round table at UVU

Following Dr. Lago, Dr. Geoffrey Cockerham addressed the audience. Dr. Cockerham, Associate Professor of Political Science and UVU, received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Arizona with a specialization in international relations. Dr. Cockerham took the time to explain the history of the United Nations, including its origins in the League of Nations as well as other important aspects of its history.

Professor Ryan J. Vogel Speaks about United Nations reform

Our third panelist was Professor Ryan J. Vogel, founding director of the Center for National Security Studies at UVU. Dr. Vogel served at the Pentagon as a senior policy advisor in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Dr. Vogel spoke to the audience regarding the United Nations Security Council. He expressed the reasons behind its formation and its current functions in todays international political environment. Among other points mentioned, he explained past efforts as well as current ideas of expanding the UN security council and the plausibility of these efforts. Dr. Vogel had the chance to expand on these subjects during a period of Q&A after the conclusion of the panel.

Mr. Clark Merkley, President of Orem Rotary during round table

Clark Merkley, Executive Director of BootUP PD, then addressed the audience. Clark currently serves as President of the Orem Rotary Club, a local branch of Rotary International. Clark spoke from a different perspective then most of the other panelists, from the perspective of the NGOs. He described the United Nations role in working with NGOs and providing a forum where they are able to gather together and discuss global issues and efforts. A key point mentioned by Clark is that Rotary has been involved with the United Nations since its creation 75 years ago. Rotary has also recently commented on the 75th anniversary of the United Nations saying that it was intending to continue its partnership into the future.

Our final speaker was Dr. Baktybek Abdrisaev, former ambassador of the Kyrgyz Republic to the United States and Canada from 1997 to 2005, and member of the Kyrgyz Parliament from 1995 to 2000. Dr. Abdrisaev spoke on aspects of Utah’s mountainous living and the United Nations commitment to sustainable mountain development. The Utah International Mountain Forum, under the mentorship of Dr. Abdrisaev, has continued over the course of several year to promote sustainable mountain development as an agenda item at the UN. This effort has led to increased international awareness toward mountain communities, a population generally overlooked in global politics. Dr. Abdrisaev spoke about Utah’s model of sustainable mountain development being an excellent model for international implementation, something that UIMF as well as UVU Rotaract, in combination with other local partners, intends to present on in a parallel event at the 64th session of the Commission on the Status of Women, being held in New York later this month.

UVU Students in the Audience

UVU Rotaract is committed to continued efforts with the United Nations. As a club, we were happy to extend our efforts toward educating the student body and attending faculty on the subject of international collaboration between such political bodies and other NGOs. As a member of UIMF, Rotaract is also committed to continued efforts with local organizations for the advancement of the sustainable mountain development agenda. We look forward to future events in which we may demonstrate our commitment to these causes through active participation.

Kyle Warren, UVU Rotaract President

BROCHURE

Front side

Back side

***

STUDENT REFLECTIVE ESSAYS

***

Dallas Karren-UVU Celebrates 75 Years of United Nations

***

Yana Andersen-UVU Celebrates the 75th Anniversary of the UN through Engaged Learning

Reviewing UIMF Preparations for Mountain Women Advocacy at CSW64

On March 17-20, 2020, the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at Utah Valley University, will participate in the 64th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (CSW64) in New York City to advocate for women and girls living in mountainous communities globally, as well as highlight how Utah Valley University’s (UVU) developed student engaged learning model (SEL) constitutes best practices for empowering youth and other learners to contribute to implementing the UN 2030 Agenda for sustainable development.

CSW64 marks the 25th anniversary of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, considered by many to be the first comprehensive global agreement on gender equality. The priority theme of CSW64 is to assess the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and how to fully realize gender equality as part of the 2030 Agenda.

Given the priority theme and in continuance of its important advocacy of sustainable mountain development (SMD) topics, the delegation’s goals for CSW64 are to:

  • Raise awareness about mountain communities and families as the most neglected groups at the national and international levels and most vulnerable to modern challenges such as climate change, outmigration, food insecurity, etc.;
  • Urge the members of the Group of Friends of Mountainous Countries to include language about mountain women and girls in the CSW64 final document, as well as reporte about measures to empower mountain communities and families in national review reports;
  • Urge the CSW64 audience to implement three mountain targets, designated by the UN among 17 SDGs as a roadmap for mountain communities to be in the focus of 2030 UN Agenda for sustainable development;
  • Host a parallel event titled “Mountain Women Empowerment Through the Inclusive Student-Engaged Learning Model” under co-sponsorship of RANS and UIMF at the Salvation Army Auditorium on March 19, 2020 at 6:15pm;
  • Promote Utah as the one of the examples of sustainable mountain development (SMD);
  • Demonstrate the effectiveness of the student engaged learning (SEL) model to advocate for mountain communities and Utah as the SMD example;
  • Deliver an oral statement and intervention from the floor during CSW64 about the above topics.

Along with sponsorship of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences (RANS) and Utah China Friendship Improvement Sharing Hands Development and Commerce (Utah China F.I.S.H. D&C)—two NGOs under consultative status with the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)—the delegation includes for the first time Project Work Groups, a company that works to find global sustainability projects related to food security, agriculture, and the environment and provide services and support for such projects from various stakeholders, including UVU and other Utah academic institutions.

Since the fall of 2019, UIMF members have worked closely with Mr. Uday Teki, founder and CEO of Project Work Groups, and other delegation members to make all preparations to attend CSW64 under SEL, which gives students the primary responsibility of solving problems related to SMD implementation by working together as a grout with faculty serving as mentors. Under SEL, the delegation has accomplished the following preparations:

  • Wrote and submitted with RANS, Utah China F.I.S.H. D&C, and Project Work Groups a written statement highlighting UIMF’s implementation of SEL to solve problems related to advocating for SMD, mountain communities and families, nontraditional students, and other sustainability issues. The statement was published by ECOSOC as official document E/CN.6/2020/NGO/91 on November 20, 2019;
  • Contacted permanent missions of various UN member states, including members of the Group of Friends of Mountainous Countries, to have meetings about building a coalition within the UN system to ensure mountain women and girls are not neglected by the UN;
  • Set up continuing partnerships with UVU Rotaract, a student club sponsored by Rotary International, to address SMD issues locally, as well as the UVU Foreign Affairs Club, to mobilize student members of the delegation;
  • Contributed language about SMD, mountain communities, nontraditional learners, and SEL to the NGO Recommendation document for the priority theme of CSW64

Under SEL, the delegation is also finalizing plans for a parallel event mentioned above in order to share best practices related to advocating under SEL for mountain communities and families, empowering all learners—including nontraditional ones—to implement the 2030 Agenda under SDG target 4.7, as well as to highlight Utah as the best model for addressing local, regional, national, and global SMD issues.

Michael Hinatsu, UIMF Vice President

***

UIMF delegation members/statements:

Samuel Elzinga, UIMF President

Jon Downs, Sustainable Mountain Development Club Vice President   

William Gum, Foreign Affairs Club Vice President

Michael Hinatsu, Foreign Affairs Club President

Mizuki Olivares, Foreign Affairs Club Vice President

Megan Raines, UVU Adjunct faculty, UIMF Alumni   

Bethany Raines, High school student

Kyle Warren, Rotaract Club President

***

UIMF delegation advisers:

Dr. Baktybek Abdrisaev, lecturer, History and Political Science, UVU ; mentor, UIMF

Dr. Ross E “Rusty” Butler, RANS focal point at the United Nations

Ms. Wendy Jyang, founder, Utah China F.I.S.H. D&C

Mr. Uday Teki, Project Work Groups founder/CEO

Democratic Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard at UVU

Presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard at Utah Valley University

On February 21, 2020, Democratic Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard came to Utah Valley University (UVU) to present her platform on which she is running for President. She was hosted by UVU History and Political Science Department and answered questions from mainly political science students. Mrs. Gabbard is a Hawaii Army National Guard major and is currently serving as the U.S. Representative for Hawaii’s second congressional district.

            One of the main points Mrs. Gabbard made during her speech is that she believes that one of the biggest problems in Washington D.C. right now is that politicians there have forgotten who they work for. They are more concerned with getting and keeping power instead of serving the people. One of the examples she used to prove this point was the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. People in Washington were so involved in the trial they forgot that most Americans had other, more pressing issues they were concerned about. She believes that politicians and people need to leave their partisanship at the door to make sure we have a government that is of, for, and by the people. We as the people need to use our power to vote and hold leaders accountable.

Presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard speaks before UVU students

            After this, the floor opened to students in the audience to ask her questions. I think one of the most relevant questions that was asked was about speakers view on second amendment rights and how she differs from her running mates. VIP-guest said that we need to first encourage a dialogue so both sides can better see eye to eye. It is a complicated issue because some are worried about their rights getting taken away while other are more concerned about shootings and how to ensure that those who wish to do harm cannot obtain firearms. We need to be able to have a conversation and find a middle ground. 

            Another question that she addressed was her take on healthcare. Congresswoman Gabbard started with discussing the issue of our current medical industry that is very greed driven. From this we are seeing prices on many medical supplies continue to rise. Some say this is because research is expensive, but this isn’t the case for all medications and technology. Things like insulin, a drug many people need to live, had its patent sold for $1 yet now a single vial can cost people over $300. She said that she would push for a single payer plus plan loosely modeled after Australia. This would provide all Americans will healthcare while still giving people the freedom to choose different options. She also said that the country can save money by pushing for prevention of health issues through education and awareness.

Presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard responds to student question

            One other question that was asked was how Congresswoman Gabbard would shift America from a culture of partisanship to compromise. She said the first thing she would do would be to invite leaders of Congress to the White House to talk. Nowadays whenever members of Congress go the white house it is a big deal and it is always scripted, not a real conversation. She said that her first years as a congresswoman was under a Republic majority, so people said she wouldn’t be able to get anything done. To try and overcome the barrier she asked her mother to make over 800 boxes of toffee for the members of Congress as well as staff. She also hand wrote notes. Because of this people from the Republican started to come up to her to thank her. Following this she was able to get things done and eventually pass a bill. She said that there needs to be a way for us to come together, treat each other with respect and have levelheaded discussions and debates.

            Finally, one other question she addressed that I found interesting was Congresswoman Gabbards’ perspective on cyber security threats coming both from China and Russia. She said that one problem is that our laws have not caught up with this threat. The government doesn’t know whose jurisdiction cyberattacks fall under and what the rules of engagement are. She also said that we need more people working within our government to protect and ensure us against threats. Many of the best people in the field are taken up into the private sector. We need to figure out a way to get these people to work for the government.

            Overall, I was very happy I had the opportunity to attend this advent. Congresswoman  Tulsi Gabbard was a candidate that I knew little about, so it was a great opportunity to hear her speak in person and see her view on issues that I and many other Americans are concerned about. One reason I think that she would make a great president is her background has given her a lot of experience that sets her apart from other candidates. Aside from serving in the National Guard, she is a woman, a Samoan-American, and the first Hindu member of U.S. Congress. I think these things give her a unique perspective that is becoming more important as the United States becomes increasingly diverse. I appreciate efforts of the UVU History and Political Science Department to arrange a presentation for us, students of such an important and interesting dignitary, which contributes to our professional advancement.

(Left to right) Jeff Hibbard, UVU student, Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard and Megan Davis, UVU student

I had a brief opportunity to meet and take a picture with Congresswoman Gabbard. She was very nice and took time to stay and talk to all who wanted to meet her.

Jeff Hibbard, UVU student

***

MEDIA ABOUT PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE TULSI GABBARD VISIT TO UTAH

Deseret News: Democrat Tulsi Gabbard Makes Campaign Stop in Utah to Share Hope to End War Unite Country

***

Daily Herald – Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Talks on Ending-Division at Provo

***

Salt Lake Tribune – Tulsi Gabbard Brings Her Campaign to Utah ahead of Super Tuesday Vote

STUDENT REFLECTIVE ESSAYS

***

Megan Davis-Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Speaks to UVU Students

***

Jake Lamoreaux-Attending Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Event

***

Dallas Karren-Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Presents before UVU students

***

Yana Andersen-Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard at Utah Valley University

***

McKay Anderson-Tulsi Gabbard Presentation at UVU

***

Thomas Ulrich-Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Visit to UVU

***

Paige Laursen-Democratic Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Visits UVU

***

Anthony Jackson-Tulsi Gabbard and Working Across the Aisle

***

Miriam Funk-Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard With UVU Students

***

Rotaract and UIMF at Utah Valley University Club-Rush 2020

On January 14-15, 2020, Utah Valley University (UVU) Rotaract participated in UVU’s semiannual Club-Rush. In attendance with over 50 clubs, members of UVU Rotaract sought to raise funds, recruit new members for its activities, and to promote seventeen of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Rotaract student members also spoke to UVU students to educate both about Rotary International (RI) and Rotaract’s role as a student club to contribute to the implementation in the state of Utah for the six areas of RI’s focus: promoting peace, fighting disease, providing clean water, saving mothers and children, supporting education, and growing local economies. 

In addition to myself, Rotaratct members such as Albany Singh, Yana Andersen, and Jose Coreas were able to aid in our efforts at Club-Rush. All our members discussed their excitement about the opportunities, which our organization provides for professional growth and networking on a global scale,  with other UVU students attending Club-Rush during the two-day event.

Left: Kyle Warren (UVU Rotaract President), Albeny Singh (UVU Rotaract Secretary)

Using the student engaged learning  model (SEL), we worked jointly with our partner clubs, Foreign Affairs and Sustainable Mountain Development, which are united under the umbrella of the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at UVU.  SEL model encourages students to work on practical tasks as a group with faculty mentoring them throughout the process. As a result, over twelve students were present at our table. Each of them were happy to discuss our club’s implementation in a variety of UN-sponsored SDGs that Rotaract had been assisting, and would continue to assist in. We shared with UVU students how Rotaract members and UIMF successfully contributed to the 68th UN Civil Society Conference in Salt Lake City during August 2019 and commemorated the World Polio Day at UVU on October 23, 2019. UVU Rotaract currently is preparing to participate and contribute to the agenda of the 64th session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, which will be hosted by the UNWomen in March of 2020.  We were excited to discuss with UVU students our involvement and the efforts of our coalition to contribute to the implementation of the SDG #5 on gender equality with focus in particular on mountain communities and families during the CSW64 in the UN headquarters. 

Rotaract members were also excited to discuss the upcoming Pan-American Conference being hosted by District Rotary in April of this year in Mexico. With Rotaractors gathering from around the world, UVU students were interested in hearing about options to get involved in such a historic event. UVU Rotaract is planning on having a few of its club members travel to Puerto Penasco for this Pan-American Conference, and contribute to the many amazing events that will be taking place under the umbrella of the District Rotary.

Overall, Club Rush was  successful in achieving both goals to raise funds and gain new student members. With a large number of individuals signing up to join the team, we now look at our upcoming opportunities with excitement and anticipation. With all the good that needs to be done in the world, UVU Rotaract is excited to be the ones who are out there doing it.

Kyle Warren, President, UVU Rotaract

***

STUDENT REFLECTIVE ESSAYS

20-01-14-Megan-Davis-Promoting the UIMF Agenda During the 2020 Spring Semester Club Rush

***

20-01-24-Yana Andersen-Rotaract at Club-Rush

***

20-01-25-Samuel Elzinga-Utah International Mountain Forum Clubs Participate in UVU Club Rush

***

20-01-24-Jose Coreas-Rotaractors contributed to UVU Club Rush

***

20-01-31-Albeny Singh-Rotaract Club Rush at Utah Valley University

***

My Summer Internship in Washington D.C. and its Valuable Lessons

Samuel Elzinga on the Dome of the Capitol

Over the summer, I had the opportunity to intern for Congresswoman Debbie Lesko (AZ-08). Interning with her was a fabulous experience, and my time out in Washington, D.C. taught me not only how congressional offices functioned in our nation’s capital, but how to remain resilient in times of uncertainty and challenges. I initially left for Washington D.C. in the beginning of June with the anticipation of interning with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs. Due to my activities at the United Nations with focus on sustainable mountain development and especially in mountain countries of Central Asia, I was extended a conditional offer to intern with them back in December of 2018, and immediately accepted. Unfortunately, due to circumstances outside my control, I arrived in Washington D.C. without my security clearance fully processed, and because of the opaque and slow-moving bureaucracy of the U.S. State Department’s clearance process, I did not know if I would get my clearance in time to intern.

(L) Samuel in the Library of Congress, (R) Samuel below the Apotheosis of George Washington in the Capitol

I would never receive word on my security clearance. Many factors go into giving someone a security clearance, and internships have a very short window to process them in time. This was, of course, a huge blow to my summer plans, as I had turned down opportunities at Cambridge University and other think tanks this summer and instead moved to Washington, D.C. However, after waiting until June 20th, 2019, with the guidance of Dr. Baktybek Abdrisaev, my mentor and a faculty at Utah Valley University, I reached out to some professional contacts, I had in the office of U.S. House Representative John Curtis (UT-03) to see if they could help with the clearance. Initially, they advocated on my behalf to the U.S. Department of State to see if that could expedite the process. When that did not work, Congressman Curtis sought to help me find a different internship in D.C. His staff sent urgent messages to offices of other members of the U.S. House of Representatives and several of them immediately positively responded without asking any security clearances.  I was able then to check first which members had any connections to Central Asian countries through their committee responsibilities: It allowed me to land an internship with Congresswoman Lesko of Arizona, who oversees the partnership of the Arizona National Guard with the military of Kazakhstan, and this twist of fate was one of the biggest blessings I had in my academic career.

It just so happened at the time I began with Congresswoman Lesko, that the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) was up for a vote in the U.S. House of Representatives. Having interned with Congressman Chris Stewart (UT-02) before and specializing in national security and defense policy, I was familiar with the process of getting the NDAA passed in the U.S. House of Representatives. The NDAA was one of the largest bills passed that summer, and one of the most controversial as well. Because of this, a lot of attention was given to ensuring Congresswoman Lesko knew the ins and outs of the bill. For this, I worked very closely with the legislative staff to catalogue each amendment and made sure stakeholders’ interests were documented.

Samuel Elzinga (L) with Congresswoman Debbie Lesko (R) at an intern appreciation event

Congresswoman Lesko’s districts hosts a very large population of ethnic Armenians, and there were many amendments to the bill relating to the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan. The staff knew I was knowledgeable in Central Asian security issues and asked me to help provide vote recommendations on these amendments that were critical to our security relations in the Caucasus. Though the Caucasus is not the same as Central Asia, I was still able to provide an extra level of expertise as it pertained to these issues. I was also able to draft correspondence to the Adjutant General of the Arizona National Guard commending his units on a successful completion of joint exercise between the Arizona National Guard and the Kazakh military. This internship, though was not what I expected for the summer, was just as fulfilling as any other internship. I was able to work on pressing issues in the Caucasus and Central Asia, all while making a noticeable impact when providing vote recommendations on national security issues. Despite the summer starting off a little rougher than expected, I will always look back on this internship with nostalgia and pride for the work I did.

Samuel Elzinga, President, Utah International Mountain Forum

Utah International Mountain Forum Service Project

Dirk Gum ( L ) brought donated clothes to the Road Home, a shelter for homeless people

In December 2019, the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at Utah Valley University (UVU) held a clothing drive to benefit local men and women in need of professional clothing. All UVU student clubs are required to engage their communities in a service project. There are forms to fill out, dates that must be noted, and club admittaturs that oversee the process. After these requirements are met, you can carry out your service project. This year the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF) was honored to collect nice clothes for the homeless in hopes that these clothes could be used for the purpose of interviewing for employment.

            Every club must engage in a local service project each quarter to maintain their status as a club registered with UVU. This is allowing students the opportunity to organize complicated tasks, engage with other students and other members of our local communities, and provide a valuable service to those who may need it. This also allows club members to realize that club organizations are a form of civil society which are valued for their own sake. UIMF’s service projects also contribute to the implementation of United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for sustainable development by empowering students to gain the knowledge and skills needed to address both local and global sustainability issues related to poverty, urbanization, and other areas in a cooperative way with various stakeholders.

            There are forms for nearly every engagement that a club may want to pursue on and off campus. These forms can be found online at https://www.uvu.edu/clubs/info/forms.html or by web searching UVU and clubs. Scroll down and you will see an expansion window titled “Service Project Information” which will take you to the form that will need to be filled out. You MUST fill these requests out two weeks before you wish to conduct the project. It is recommended that you take it upon yourself to go to the club office because there may be certain requirements, such as cash handling, that can only be fulfilled in person. Calling and emails are recommended and are considered a formality in today’s professional environment.

            For this year’s UIMF Project, several members, including Michael Hinatsu, UIMF Vice President  and myself  collected clothing from local student housing apartment complexes. UIMF student members asked their peers for clothes that could be used for the purposes of interviewing. This will allow job seekers the opportunity to compete in the job market. Student peers were extremely responsive; they donated what they could, and many professional clothes were gathered. Some students were extremely charitable. For instance, a couple individuals, including Barbara Christiansen, a writer for the UVU Marketing and Communications Department, donated brand new clothes which will undoubtedly advance the current living conditions of someone in need. These clothes were donated directly to The Road Home 529 9th Ave, Midvale UT.

The Road Home is a shelter for men, families, and anyone who is in need. Unlike thrift stores and chains, The Road Home never sells their donations which means that you can be sure that your donations will go directly to benefit someone, as opposed to a thrift shopper. This is important because thrift stores, which can provide value to those in need, are often targeted by bargain shoppers, and this leaves a lower quality of clothes to those who may be in need. This means that when new clothes are donated, like the clothes donated by Christiansen mentioned above, these clothes will go directly to men, women, and children who have applied for assistance here locally in Utah.

            Though service projects are a requirement to maintain club membership at UVU, UIMF students were allowed the opportunity to be creative in helping address real issues to those in need locally. This required an in-depth engagement process of filling out paperwork, timing, and organizing with the administrations that oversee these projects. It is the express wish of the UIMF and its members to help those who live in mountain regions around the world and here at home in Utah. By providing services to those in need by researching where they are and how we can help them directly, we can make a real and meaningful difference for those in our communities.

Dirk Gum, UIMF member

UIMF Preparations for Mountain Women Advocacy at CSW64

On November 30, 2019, the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) published as official document E/CN.6/2020/NGO/91 a joint written statement by the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences (RANS), and Utah China Friendship Improvement Sharing Hands Development and Commerce (Utah China F.I.S.H. D.&C.), NGOs in consultative status with ECOSOC. The statement supported efforts of Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of student clubs at Utah Valley University UVU) to advocate for mountain women and girls at the 64th session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW64) in March of 2020.

The statement, titled “Mountain women and girls must be in the focus of 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” highlights UIMF’s implementation of UVU’s developed student engaged learning model (SEL), which gives students the primary responsibility of working as a group, with faculty serving as mentors, to solve problems related to advocating for sustainable mountain development, mountain communities and families, nontraditional students, and other sustainability issues.

The statement advocates for the inclusion of mountain communities and families, including women and girls—who are among the world’s most neglected and poorest groups—in the assessment of the landmark Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, which is the focus of CSW64.

UIMF is currently preparing for advocacy campaign at CSW64 during March 17-20, 2019, to meet the following goals:

  • Raise awareness about mountain communities and families as the most neglected groups at the national and international levels and most vulnerable to modern challenges such as climate change, outmigration, food insecurity, etc.;
  • Urge the members of the Group of Friends of Mountainous Countries to include language about mountain women and girls in the CSW64 final document, as well as reporte about measures to empower mountain communities and families in national review reports;
  • Urge the CSW64 audience to implement three mountain targets, designated by the UN among 17 SDGs as a roadmap for mountain communities to be in the focus of 2030 UN Agenda for sustainable development;
  • Host a parallel event titled “Mountain Women Empowerment Through the Inclusive Student-Engaged Learning Model” under co-sponsorship of RANS and UIMF at the Salvation Army Auditorium on March 19, 2020 at 6:15pm;
  • Promote Utah as the one of the examples of sustainable mountain development (SMD);
  • Demonstrate the effectiveness of the student engaged learning (SEL) model to advocate for mountain communities and Utah as the SMD example;
  • Deliver an oral statement and intervention from the floor during CSW64 about the above topics.

UIMF preparations for CSW64 also include building a coalition of students and other stakeholders, affiliated with Project Work Groups, a company that works to find global sustainability projects related to food security, agriculture, and the environment and provide services and support for such projects from Brigham Young University, The University of Utah, and Utah State University, in order to augment the youth/student voice to better achieve the above goals.

Michael Hinatsu, UIMF Vice President

***

Written Statement of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and Utah China Friendship Improvement Sharing Hands Development & Commerce

***

CSW64 Parallel Events Schedule

***

NGO CSW Forum Orientation Series:

***

VIDEO 10: Highlights: The First week of CSW

VIDEO 9: Preparing for Your Trip

VIDEO 8: UN Grounds Pass

VIDEO 7: Preparing for CSW64

VIDEO 6: Preparing for CSW64 Process

VIDEO 5: Preparing for CSW64 Participation

VIDEO 4: Events & Registration

VIDEO 3: NGO Forum Overview

VIDEO 2: CSW Registration

VIDEO 1: Introduction and Visa Information

UIMF Contributed to 2019 International Mountain Day Observation at United Nations

(L to R):  PR of Canada to the UN Mr. Marc-Andre Blanchard,
Ms. Carla Mucavi, Director, FAO liaison office in New York;
PR of the Kyrgyz Republic to the UN Mrs. Mirgul Moldoisaeva; and
PR of Norway to the UN Ms. Mona Juul preparing their statements

On December 11th, 2019, the Utah International Mountain Forum, a coalition of student clubs at Utah Valley University (UVU) was invited for the second time to contribute to the observation of the International Mountain Day (IMD) at the United Nations headquarters and promote sustainable mountain development (SMD) agenda of the United Nations. The event was hosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO-UN), Mountain Partnership, and the Group of Friends of Mountainous Countries, headed by the Permanent Mission of the Kyrgyz Republic to the UN. The event was attended by diplomats, representing over 20 members of the Group of Friends of Mountainous countries. This year’s theme of IMD was titled “Mountains Matter for Youth,” and UIMF was the only student group invited to the event. This was also the first time when UIMF represented the United Nations Association of the United States of America (UNA-USA), as recently established chapter of that prominent NGO on my campus.  UNA-USA is one of the oldest and prominent NGOs in the United States which promotes values of the UN nationwide.

The event was moderated by Ms. Carla Mucavi, the director of the FAO liaison office in New York, who reminded everyone in attendance of the importance of mountains and those who call them home. Mountains are home to over 1 billion people and provide food, water, and resources to billions more. Despite their importance globally, mountains are often left out of global discussions on climate change. Her Excellency Mrs. Mirgul Moldoisaeva, Permanent Representative (PR) of the Kyrgyz Republic to the United Nations, also reiterated the importance of mountains globally and to her home country while also informing those attending of her country’s initiatives to promote youth engagement in the SMD agenda.

Attendees of the International Mountain Day observation at the United Nations headquarters

The first part of the event featured a panel of PRs of different mountain nations accredited to the UN as keynote presenters. PR of Norway to the UN Ms. Mona Juul, PR of Canada to the UN Mr. Marc-Andre Blanchard, PR of Andorra to the UN Mrs. Elisenda Vives Balmana, PR of Bhutan to the UN Mrs. Doma Tsering, PR of Nepal to the UN Mr. Amrit Bahadur Rai, PR of Greece to the UN Mrs. Maria Theofili, Deputy PR of Austria to the UN Mr. Hans-Joachim Almoslechner, and Deputy PR of Italy to the UN Mr. Stefano Stefanile spoke on what their country do to  empower youth in mountainous regions. Most notably, Austria is including special dialogues in their youth parliament about sustaining and preserving alpine culture, Canada’s youth board is additionally holding special discussions on supporting unemployed youth within the mountainous regions of Canada, Andorra has integrated the SDGs into their school curriculum, Bhutan has plans to cut youth unemployment by half in their country in 2023, and Greece is in the process of developing a specific and coordinated policy to support youth in rural mountain villages.

During the second part of the event Assistant Secretary General of the UN, Head of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) New York Office, Satya Tripathi spoke on the importance of mountains and the dire need to protect them. He reminded attendees that mountains sustain half of the world’s population through their resources, and unfortunately, are the first indicators of climate change. He remarked that the international community has not acted in 10 years, and we need to scale up the international solutions.

Samuel Elzinga addresses the attendees of IMD

During my presentation, I spoke about successes UIMF has had since its establishment in 2011  in implementing the SMD agenda in the state of Utah and globally through the inclusive student engaged learning (SEL). SEL, an educational philosophy employed by my university, allows students to gain practical skills through real-world experiences as a group when faculty serve them as mentors. 

I spoke how from 2013 to 2015, through this model, students advocated for the adoption of mountain targets at sessions of the UN Open Working Groups on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); the fourth International Women of the Mountains conference on October 7-9, 2015. I reminded the audience that UIMF members have advocated for the implementation of mountain targets at forums of the UN ECOSOC on sustainable development such as the 52nd session of the Commission on Social Development; the 62nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW62) and CSW63; and the 2018 High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development. I also highlighted how students were able to include language about mountain communities for the first time in the final document of the 68th UN Civil Society Conference, held in Salt Lake City, Utah on August 26-28, 2019. The Preamble of the Conference’s Outcome Document stated the need to address the specific conditions of mountainous areas and small island developing states. At the conference, UIMF also hosted a workshop and an exhibition about the student engaged learning model to advocate for mountain women and targets at the United Nations.

Our next priority is to advocate for mountain women and girls at the CSW64 this march, which will assess the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. The Declaration and Platform does not specifically mention mountain women and girls. However, it includes actions critical to empower such vulnerable groups, in particular through education. Our delegation will be comprised of students from UVU, Brigham Young University, and Utah State University. It will also provide them an opportunity to conduct the advocacy campaign jointly with mountainous nations accredited to the United Nations. We hope to both learn and share experiences in mountain targets implementation with the newly created Group of Friends of Mountainous Countries.

I remarked that UIMF has already achieved the following:

  1. Through the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and Utah China F.I.S.H.D.C, NGOs accredited with ECOSOC and Mountain Partnership members, requested in written statement to include mountain women and girls in the final document of CSW 64.
  2. A parallel event scheduled at CSW 64 on March 19, 2020 about mountain women and girls advocacy through the student engaged learning and a similar request about them to be included in the final document of CSW 64.
  3. Plans to make an oral statement and intervention from the floor during CSW64.

I also urged the members of the Group of Friends of Mountainous Countries to include:

  1. In the draft of the CSW64 final document a language about bringing mountain women and girls in the focus of 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development;
  2. In national review reports about their actions about empowering mountain families and women.
  3. Members of UVU delegation to  their side event, if they are hosting the one during the second week of the CSW64;

After my presentation, Dr. Orlove of Columbia University spoke about his research in compiling data on the effects of climate change in mountainous regions. He reiterated the importance of taking action to protect these unique ecosystems. Overall, it was an important event raising an awareness about challenges experienced by mountain communities worldwide, and I am grateful for the chance to have participated. I would like to also thank the UVU College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the History and Political Science Department, for co-sponsoring this trip on such short notice as well as other initiatives of UIMF to advocate SMD since 2011.

Samuel Elzinga, President, UIMF

***

AGENDA OF THE EVENT

***

UIMF Power Point Presentation at UN

***

Statement Copy

***

MEDIA ABOUT UIMF AT IMD

***

FAO-UN About IMD at UN

***

Daily Herald- UVU students speak to UN group on mountain communities

2019 United Nations Secretary Generals’ Report on SMD recognizes UIMF

In March of 2018 I was the president of the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF) which a coalition of student led clubs at Utah Valley University. (UVU) We had the opportunity to host both a side event and a parallel event at the 62nd United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. (CSW62).

It is heart warming that nearly two years later our efforts were highlighted in the 2019 Secretary General’s report on Sustainable Mountain Development. (P10). This Achievement was the result of a team effort by many students both part of the UIMF and those that are part of other on-campus organizations. Our objective at the CSW62 was to promote mountain sustainability by presenting projects that students had worked on in the field of improving the status of Women. Most of these projects had taken place in Utah which is a mountainous State that has prospered due to efforts to create a sustainable way of life.

The UIMF strives to share ideas from mountainous communities that better the livelihood of Men, Women, children, and the population as a whole.

Matt Rands, UIMF President (2017-2018)

***

2019 UNSGs’ report on SMD

***

Excerpt from the 2019 UNSG report on SMD about UIMF

***

STUDENT REFLECTIVE ESSAYS

***

Dylan Genes-The great recognition of UN Secretary General of UIMF activities at CSW62

***

Derek Gardield-Our success starts with us

***

10th Annual International Mountain Day Observation at Utah Valley University

The International Mountain Day (IMD) at UVU was observed for the third time under the umbrellas of the United Nations Mountain Partnership and the United Nations Academic Impact and for the first time as part of the United Nations Association of the United States of America

On December 2nd, the Utah International Mountain Forum (UIMF), a coalition of clubs at Utah Valley University (UVU), observed for the 10th time the International Mountain Day (IMD).   This event about why mountains matter for youth was hosted by UIMF through the student engaged learning model, which provides students the opportunity to resolve complex problems as a group under faculty mentorship.

IMD 2019 was hosted under the umbrella of both the MP and the UN Academic Impact (UNAI), which is an initiative of the UN Department of Global Communications. UIMF also observed IMD as a chapter of the United Nations Association of the United States (UNA-USA) at UVU. UNA-USA, which has promoted UN values in the US since 1943, posted a toolkit why mountains matter for youth and officially included IMD among the UN events to be observed by its 60,000 members and over 200 chapters nationwide.     

During the event, Dr. Baldomero Lago, UVU Vice Rector for Global Engagement and UNAI representative, congratulated UIMF on contribution in the 68th UN Civil Society Conference (68UNCSC) in Salt Lake City as the only student – led group which hosted a poster session and a workshop and added language in the outcome document about mountain communities;

Dr. Rusty Butler, main representative at the UN of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences, an NGO in General Consultative status with ECOSOC and MP member, spoke about joint with UIMF advocacy efforts at the 63rd Commission on the Status of Women and preparations for CSW64 in March 2020. 

Mrs. Wendy Jyang, Founder of Utah China F.I.S.H. D&C, another NGO in special consultative status with ECOSOC and MP member, discussed joint activities of her NGO with UIMF during CSW63 as well.

Mr. Uday Teki, CEO of Project Work Groups, introduced his company initiatives to reduce food insecurity in mountain communities worldwide and informed about preparations for students from three major Universities in Utah to join the UIMF delegation at CSW64.

Ms. Lacee Meyer Vice President of UIMF, spoke about challenges experienced by rural and mountain communities and her vision about local economic development.in Utah.

Mr. Michael Hinatsu Vice President of UIMF, informed about UIMF’s advocacy for mountain targets and women during CSW63, 68UNCSC and coming visit to CSW64.

At the end of the event, UIMF leaders presented on behalf of the MP a specially designed certificates to all contributors to the SMD advocacy in Utah and globally.

Samuel Elzinga, President, UIMF

***

TASK LIST

***

Video 1 from IMD

Video 2 from IMD

***

Photos of the IMD 2019

***

BROCHURE OF THE EVENT

Front side
Back side

***

MEDIA ABOUT IMD AT UVU

***

Mountain Partnership About Samuel Elzinga and UIMF

***

Mountain Partnership About IMD at UVU

***

UNA-USA About IMD and Why Mountains Matter for Youth

***

IMD at UNA-USA Calendar

***

STUDENT REFLECTIVE ESSAYS

Thomas Ulrich ———————– Meg Haroldsen

***

Caleb Stowell ——————– Conner Schenk

***

Bethany Smith ——————– Anthony Jackson

***

Dillon Vanderhooft ——————– Jake Jex

***

Victoria Bindrup ——————– Ashlyn Baker

***

Albeny-Singh ——————- Jeff Hibbard

***

Moesinger Krosbi ——————- Emily Burke

***

Yana-Andersen ——————- Austin Meline

***

Brennan Pearson ——————- Lee Kanyon

***

Carter Morrison ——————– Titus Elanyu

***

Michael Hinatsu ——————– Rachel Godfrey

***

Mark Driggs ——————– Hannah Thayne

***

James Uhl ——————– Abdulrahman Alghanmi

***

Kyle Warren

A Coalition of UVU Clubs